Do you think you have a sleeping disorder?

Disclaimer: This sleep test is not intended as medical advice. If you think you may have a sleep disorder, contact Dr. Sosenko (1-800-SNORING) or your primary care physician, regardless of the results of this test .
1.
Do you snore heavily?
2.
Have you been told you have long lapses between breaths while you sleep?
3. Do you have high blood pressure?
4. Do you have difficulty falling asleep?
5. Do you fall asleep when reading, watching TV or during other passive activities?
6. Do you wake up with a choking or gasping sensation?
7. Do you wake up feeling tired or fatigued?
8. Do you experience unusual behaviors just before, during, or after sleep?
9. Does your bed partner complain of loud snoring, leg twitching, or kicking at night?
10. Do you wake frequently or have difficult time falling back to sleep?
11. Do you fight sleepiness on the job or when driving?

If you have answered “yes” to two or more of these questions, you might be at risk for a sleep disorder. Discuss your symptoms and concerns with your doctor.

For more general information on sleep disorders see The National Sleep Foundation


How sleepy are you?

The Epworth Sleepiness Scale is a questionnaire that is often used world wide to assess your level of sleepiness. This scale should not be used to make your diagnosis. It is intended to help you identify your own level of daytime sleepiness.
  • 0=Would never doze
  • 1=Slight chance of dozing
  • 2=Moderate chance of dozing
  • 3=High chance of dozing

Situation

Chance of Dozing

1. Sitting and reading.
0
1
2
3
2. Watching television.
0
1
2
3
3. Sitting inactive in a public place such as in a theater or meeting.
0
1
2
3
4. As a passenger in car for an hour without a break.
0
1
2
3
5. Lying down to rest in the afternoon
0
1
2
3
6. Sitting and talking to someone
0
1
2
3
7. Sitting quietly after lunch (when you’ve had no alcohol)
0
1
2
3
8. In a car, while stopped in traffic
0
1
2
3
If you’ve scored: 6 -10 or higher, you may have a problem with daytime sleepiness. However, a score below this does not necessarily mean you don’t have a problem. Please discuss your symptoms with your physician.

What’s your Snore Score?

The following information was taken from American Sleep Apnea Association brochure called Tired of Snoring? It’s NO Joke. Please contact the above source if you’d like a brochure regarding facts on sleep apnea.
Your answers to this sleep quiz will help you decide whether you may suffer from sleep apnea:
1.
Are you a loud, habitual snorer?
2.
Do you feel tired and groggy on awakening?
3. Are you often sleepy during waking hours and/ or can you fall asleep quickly?
4. Are you overweight and/or do you have a large neck?
5. Have you been observed to choke, gasp, or hold your breath during sleep?


If you or someone close to you answers “yes” to any of the above questions, you should discuss your symptoms with your sleep physician or sleep specialist. Or ask the American Sleep Apnea Association for more information on the diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea. Different treatments are available.

Sleep Observer Test

The following questions relate to the behavior that you have observed in the patient is while he/she is asleep. Use the following scale to choose the most appropriate number for each situation.
0=Never
1=Infrequently (1 night per week)
2=Frequently (2-3 nights per week)
3=Most of the time (4 or more nights per week)
1.
Loud, irritating snoring ______
2.
Choking or gasping for air _______
3. Pauses in breathing _______
4. Twitching / kicking of arms or legs _______
5. Snoring requiring separate bedrooms _______
6. Falling asleep inappropriately (example: while driving or at meetings)_______
Total score ______
A score of 5 or greater indicates symptoms which are affecting the health, safety, or quality of life of the observed person.

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